Can Laptop Ram Be Used In Desktop

 

Can You Use Laptop RAM in Desktop? A Complete Guide

  Maybe you have some spare laptop RAM modules lying around, or you want to upgrade your desktop memory without spending too much. Or maybe you are just curious about the differences between laptop and desktop RAM.

Whatever the case,  I will answer the question of whether you can use laptop RAM in desktop, and explain everything you need to know about it. I will also give you some tips and tricks on how to do it successfully, and what to watch out for.

What is Laptop RAM and Desktop RAM?

  let’s first understand what laptop RAM and desktop RAM are, and how they differ from each other.

RAM stands for Random Access Memory, and it is one of the most important components of any computer system. RAM is where your computer stores and accesses data that it needs to run programs and perform tasks. The more RAM you have, the faster and smoother your computer can operate.

However, not all RAMs are the same. There are different types and sizes of RAM modules, depending on the device they are designed for. Laptop RAM and desktop RAM are two of the most common types of RAM modules, and they have some key differences that you should know.

Laptop RAM

Laptop RAM, also known as SODIMM (Small Outline Dual In-line Memory Module), is the type of RAM module that is used in laptops, notebooks, and some small form factor desktops. Laptop RAM modules are smaller and thinner than desktop RAM modules, and they have fewer pins and notches on their connectors.

The main reason why laptop RAM modules are smaller is to save space and power consumption in laptops, which are designed to be portable and battery-operated. Laptop RAM modules typically range from 4 GB to 32 GB in capacity, and they come in different generations and speeds, such as DDR3, DDR4, and DDR5.

Here is a table that shows the different generations of laptop RAM modules and their pin counts:

Generation        Pin Count

SDR RAM            100

DDR SDRAM        200

DDR2 SDRAM      200

DDR3 SDRAM      204

DDR4 SDRAM       260

DDR5 SDRAM       262

Desktop RAM

Desktop RAM, also known as DIMM (Dual In-line Memory Module), is the type of RAM module that is used in most desktop PCs, workstations, and servers. Desktop RAM modules are larger and thicker than laptop RAM modules, and they have more pins and notches on their connectors.

The main reason why desktop RAM modules are larger is to provide more capacity and performance in desktop PCs, which are designed to be powerful and stable. Desktop RAM modules typically range from 4 GB to 2 TB in capacity, and they also come in different generations and speeds, such as DDR3, DDR4, and DDR5.

Here is a table that shows the different generations of desktop RAM modules and their pin counts:

Generation         Pin Count

DDR SDRAM        184

DDR2 SDRAM      240

DDR3 SDRAM      240

DDR4 SDRAM      288

DDR5  SDRAM     288

 

As you can see from the tables above, laptop RAM and desktop RAM have different pin counts and sizes, which means they are not compatible with each other by default. However, there is a way to use laptop RAM in desktop, which I will explain in the next section.

How to Use Laptop RAM in Desktop?

So, can you use laptop RAM in desktop? The answer is yes, but you will need a special adapter that converts SODIMM to DIMM. This adapter is a small circuit board that plugs into the laptop RAM module on one end, and into the desktop RAM slot on the other end. It basically bridges the gap between the different pin counts and sizes of the two types of RAM modules.

Here is an example of what a SODIMM to DIMM adapter looks like:

 

You can find these adapters online or in some computer shops, and they are usually not very expensive. However, before you buy one, there are some things you need to consider.

Compatibility

The first thing you need to check is the compatibility of your laptop RAM and desktop motherboard. Not all laptop RAM modules and desktop motherboards are compatible with each other, even with the adapter. There are several factors that affect the compatibility, such as:

  • The generation and speed of the RAM modules. You need to make sure that your laptop RAM and desktop motherboard support the same generation and speed of RAM, such as DDR3, DDR4, or DDR5. For example, you cannot use a DDR4 laptop RAM module in a DDR3 desktop motherboard, even with the adapter.
  • The voltage and timing of the RAM modules. You also need to make sure that your laptop RAM and desktop motherboard have the same voltage and timing specifications, such as 1.2V, 1.35V, or 1.5V, and CL9, CL10, or CL11. For example, you cannot use a 1.35V laptop RAM module in a 1.5V desktop motherboard, even with the adapter.
  • The manufacturer and model of the motherboard. You also need to check the manufacturer and model of your desktop motherboard, and see if it supports laptop RAM modules with the adapter. Some motherboards may have BIOS settings or firmware updates that enable or disable the use of laptop RAM modules. For example, some Intel motherboards can support laptop RAM modules with the adapter, but some AMD motherboards cannot.

To check the compatibility of your laptop RAM and desktop motherboard, you can use online tools such as Crucial System Scanner or Memory Stock, or consult the manuals or websites of your RAM and motherboard manufacturers.

Installation

The second thing you need to do is to install the laptop RAM module and the adapter in your desktop PC. This is a fairly simple process, but you need to be careful and follow some steps:

  • Turn off your desktop PC and unplug it from the power source.
  • Open the case of your desktop PC and locate the RAM slots on the motherboard. You may need to remove some screws or clips to access the RAM slots.
  • Align the laptop RAM module with the adapter, and make sure the notches on the connectors match. Gently push the laptop RAM module into the adapter until it clicks into place. You may need to apply some force, but do not bend or damage the pins or the circuit board.
  • Align the adapter with the RAM slot on the motherboard, and make sure the notches on the connectors match. Gently push the adapter into the RAM slot until it clicks into place. You may need to apply some force, but do not bend or damage the pins or the circuit board.
  • Secure the adapter and the laptop RAM module with the clips or screws that came with the adapter, or use the ones that were already on the RAM slot.
  • Close the case of your desktop PC and plug it back into the power source.
  • Turn on your desktop PC and check if the laptop RAM module is detected and working properly. You can use tools such as CPU Z or Speccy to check the details of your RAM modules.

Here is a video that shows how to install laptop RAM in desktop using an adapter:

Performance

The third thing you need to know is the performance of using laptop RAM in desktop. Will it make your desktop PC faster or slower? Well, it depends.

Using laptop RAM in desktop can have some advantages and disadvantages, such as:

  • Advantages:
    • You can save money by using your existing laptop RAM modules or buying cheaper laptop RAM modules than desktop RAM modules.
    • You can save space and power consumption by using smaller and thinner laptop RAM modules than desktop RAM modules.
    • You can increase the capacity and diversity of your RAM by using laptop RAM modules along with desktop RAM modules, as long as they are compatible and balanced.
  • Disadvantages:
    • You may lose performance by using slower or lower quality laptop RAM modules than desktop RAM modules.
    • You may encounter compatibility or stability issues by using laptop RAM modules that are not supported or optimized by your desktop motherboard or BIOS.
    • You may void the warranty or damage your RAM modules or motherboard by using an adapter that is not certified or reliable.

Therefore, the performance of using laptop RAM in desktop may vary depending on your specific situation and configuration. You may need to do some testing and benchmarking to see if it is worth it or not.

Conclusion

In conclusion, you can use laptop RAM in desktop, but you will need a special adapter that converts SO-DIMM to DIMM. However, you also need to check the compatibility, installation, and performance of using laptop RAM in desktop, and weigh the pros and cons of doing so.